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Dangerous Foods Dogs Can and Can’t Eat

We share everything with our dogs: our hearts, our homes, and our food. Surely there’s nothing wrong with sharing some of your favorite foods with your favorite pupper, right? Not necessarily. Many foods, such as fruits and vegetables, that humans digest with ease can wreak havoc in a dog’s system, causing severe health problems. Here’s just some of the foods to be aware of. As a side note, remember that just because your dog can eat these certain foods doesn’t necessarily mean it will be health beneficial. Only feed a small amount of what they can eat. We’ll start off with the good news and then the bad.

 

Dogs CAN eat...

Bread: Yes, dogs can eat bread. Small amounts of plain bread (no spices and definitely no raisins) won’t hurt your dog, but it also won’t provide any health benefits either. It has no nutritional value and can really pack on the carbohydrates and calories, just like in people. Homemade breads are a better option than store-bought, as bread from the grocery store typically contains unnecessary preservatives, but it’s best to avoid it altogether.


Certain Nuts (Cashews & Peanuts): Yes, dogs can eat cashews and peanuts. Cashews are OK for dogs, but only a few at a time. A few cashews make a nice treat, but only if they’re unsalted.They’ve got calcium, magnesium, antioxidants, and proteins, but while these nuts contain less fat than others, too many can lead to weight gain and other fat-related conditions. Peanuts are packed with good fats and proteins that can benefit your dog. Just be sure to give peanuts in moderation, as you don’t want your dog taking in too much fat, which can lead to pancreas issues. Also, avoid salted peanuts.


Cheese: Yes, dogs can eat cheese in small to moderate quantities. As long as your dog isn’t lactose intolerant, which is rare, but still possible in canines, cheese can be a great treat. Many kinds of cheese can be high in fat, so go for lower-fat varieties like cottage cheese or mozzarella.


Coconut: Yes, coconut is OK for dogs. This funky fruit contains lauric acid, which can help combat bacteria and viruses. It can also help with bad breath and clearing up skin conditions like hot spots, flea allergies, and itchy skin. Coconut milk and coconut oil are safe for dogs too. Just be sure your dog doesn’t get its paws on the furry outside of the shell, which can get lodged in the throat.



Corn: Yes, dogs can eat corn BUT NOT corn on the cob. Corn is one of the most common ingredients in most dog foods. However, the cob can be hard for a dog to digest and may cause an intestinal blockage. So if you’re sharing some corn, make sure it is off the cob.


Eggs: Yes, dogs can eat eggs. Eggs are safe for dogs as long as they are fully cooked. Cooked eggs are a wonderful source of protein and can help an upset stomach. However, eating raw egg whites can contribute to biotin deficiency, so be sure to cook the eggs all the way through before giving them to your pet.


Ham: Yes, dogs can eat ham. Ham is OK for dogs to eat, but certainly isn’t the healthiest for them. Ham is high in sodium and fat, so while sharing a small piece is all right, it shouldn’t be a continuous habit.


Honey: Yes, dogs can eat honey. Honey is packed with countless nutrients such as vitamins A, B, C, D, E, and K, potassium, calcium, magnesium, copper, and antioxidants. Feeding dogs small amounts of honey can help with allergies because it introduces small amounts of pollen to their systems, building up immunity to allergens in your area. In addition to consuming honey, the sticky spread can also be used as a topical treatment for burns and superficial cuts.


Meat (Pork & Turkey): Yes, dogs can eat pork and turkey however, any meat with excessive salt, seasonings, onions or garlic should NOT be fed. Pork is a highly digestible protein, packed with amino acids, and it contains more calories per pound than other meats. Pork also may be less likely to cause an allergic reaction in some pets compared to other proteins. 


Turkey is fine for dogs, but be sure to remove excess fat and skin from the meat. Don’t forget to check for bones; poultry bones can splinter during digestion, causing blockage or even tears in the intestines. Hooked Paw Me! Turkey Tendon Pet Treat has only ONE ingredient and NO additives or preservatives. They’re packed with protein and baked at low temperatures to keep its nutritional values.


Peanut butter: Yes, peanut butter is OK for dogs. Peanut butter can be an excellent source of protein for dogs. It contains heart-healthy fats, vitamins B and E and niacin. Raw, unsalted peanut butter is the healthiest option. Read the label carefully to be sure the peanut butter does not contain xylitol, a sugar substitute that can be toxic to dogs.


Popcorn: Yes, dogs can eat popcorn. Unsalted, unbuttered, air-popped popcorn is OK for your dog in moderation. It contains riboflavin and thiamine, both of which promote eye health and digestion, as well as small amounts of iron and protein. Be sure to pop the kernels all the way before giving them to your dog, as unpopped kernels could become a choking hazard.


Seafood (Salmon, Sardines, Tuna, & Shrimp): Yes, dogs can eat fully cooked fish and shrimp, NEVER uncooked or undercooked, and only in moderations. Fish contains good fats and amino acids, giving your dog a nice health boost. Salmon is loaded with vitamins and protein. Sardines have soft, digestible bones for extra calcium. With the exception of sardines, be sure to pick out all the tiny bones, which can be tedious but is definitely necessary. 


Tuna is an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids, which promotes heart and eye health. Hooked Paw Me! Tuna Pet Treats (Tuna Nuggets, Tuna Steak, Tuna Bone) have only ONE ingredient and NO additives or preservatives. They are packed with protein and baked at a low temperature to keep its nutritional value. As for canned tuna, it contains small amounts of mercury and sodium, which should be avoided in excess. A little bit of canned tuna and tuna juice here and there is fine, as long as it doesn’t contain any spices. Never feed your dog uncooked or undercooked fish, only fully cooked and cooled, and limit your dog’s fish intake to no more than twice a week.


A few shrimps every now and then is fine for your dog, but only if they are fully cooked and the shell (including the tail, head, and legs) is removed completely. Shrimp are high in antioxidants, vitamin B-12, and phosphorus, but also low in fat, calories, and carbohydrates.



Dogs CAN’T eat...

Apple Seeds: No, dogs shouldn’t eat apple seeds. The casing of apple seeds is toxic to dogs as they contain a natural chemical (Amygdalin) that releases cyanide when digested. This is really only an issue if a large amount is eaten and the seed is chewed up by the dog, causing it to enter its bloodstream. To play it safe, be sure to core and seed apples before you feed them to your dog.


Avocado: No, dogs shouldn’t eat avocados. Avocados contain persin, which can cause diarrhea, vomiting and heart congestion. The most dangerous part of an avocado is the pit because it is a choking hazard and it is full of persin. If you think your dog has ingested an avocado pit, call your vet asap. If your dog ate a small piece of avocado, it will probably be okay, but make sure you monitor your dog and call your vet for further care.


Cat Food: No, dogs shouldn’t eat cat food. Cat food contains proteins and fats that target the diet of a cat, not a dog. The protein and fat levels in cat food are too high for your dog, and not healthy. Ingesting too much cat food can result in an upset stomach, obesity and pancreatitis.


Certain Nuts (Almonds, Pecans, Walnuts, & Macadamia): No, dogs shouldn’t eat these nuts. Macadamia nuts, especially, are some of the MOST poisonous foods for dogs. It can cause vomiting, increased body temperature, inability to walk, and lethargy. Even worse, they can affect the nervous system. Almonds can block the esophagus or even tear the windpipe if not chewed completely. Salted almonds are especially dangerous because they can increase water retention, which is potentially fatal to dogs prone to heart disease. 


Chocolate: No, dogs should NEVER eat chocolate. This isn’t just an urban legend. Chocolate contains toxic substances called methylxanthines, which are stimulants that stop a dog’s metabolic process. Even just a little bit of chocolate, especially dark chocolate, can cause diarrhea and vomiting. A large amount can cause seizures, irregular heart function, and even death. Do not have chocolate in an accessible location for your dog. If your dog does ingest chocolate, contact a veterinarian or Pet Poison Helpline as soon as possible.


Cinnamon: No, dogs shouldn’t eat cinnamon. While cinnamon is not actually toxic to dogs, it’s probably best to avoid it. Cinnamon and its oils can irritate the inside of dogs’ mouths, making them uncomfortable and sick. It can lower a dog’s blood sugar too much and can lead to diarrhea, vomiting, increased, or decreased heart rate, and even liver disease. If they inhale it in powder form, cinnamon can cause difficulty breathing, coughing, and choking.


Cooked Bones: No, dogs shouldn’t eat cooked bones. When it comes to bones, the danger is that cooked bones can easily splinter when chewed by your dog. Raw (uncooked) bones, however, are appropriate and suitable for both your dog’s nutrition and teeth.


Corn on the Cob: No, dogs shouldn’t eat corn on the cob. As stated above, while small amounts of corn are safe for a dog to ingest, giving your dog an ear of corn can be dangerous. If your dog is determined enough (which let’s face it, most dogs are) they will eat the cob and all. The cob can be a choking hazard and can cause intestinal blockage. This could be fatal to your dog.


Fat Trimmings: No, dogs shouldn’t eat fat trimmings. Cooked and uncooked fat trimmings can cause pancreatitis.


Garlic: No, dogs shouldn’t eat garlic. Like onions, leeks, and chives, garlic is part of the Allium family, and it is five times more toxic to dogs than the rest of the Allium plants. Garlic can create anemia in dogs, causing side effects such as pale gums, elevated heart rate, weakness, and collapse. Poisoning from garlic and onions may have delayed symptoms, so if you think your dog may have eaten some, monitor him or her for a few days, not just right after consumption.


Grapes & Raisins: No, dogs shouldn’t eat grapes and raisins. Grapes and raisins can cause kidney failure for dogs. Even a small amount can make a dog ill. Vomiting is an early symptom followed by depression and low energy. We’ve heard stories of dogs dying from only a handful of grapes, so do not feed your pup this potentially toxic food.


Milk & Dairy Products: No, dogs shouldn’t eat milk and dairy products. While small doses aren’t going to be fatal to your dog, you could get some smelly farts and some nasty cases of diarrhea. Milk and dairy products can cause digestive problems as well as trigger food allergies.


Salt & Sugar: No, dogs shouldn’t eat salt and/or sugar. Salt isn’t the healthiest thing for humans, it’s even less healthy for dogs. Too much of it can lead to sodium ion poisoning, which may result in vomiting, diarrhea, depression, tremors, increased temperature, seizures and even death. Sugar, too much of it, can lead to dental issues, obesity and even diabetes.


Xylitol: No, dogs shouldn’t eat xylitol products. Xylitol, a sugar alcohol found in gum, candy, baked goods, and other sugar-substituted items, is EXTREMELY toxic to dogs. Even small amounts can cause low blood sugar, seizures, liver failure and even death for your pup.



About Petique, Inc. 

Located in Ontario, California, Petique, Inc. is a women owned business specializing in non-toxic pet supplies and consumables. Pet owners ourselves, we share a passion to create a positive, healthy and fun environment for your furry family members. We also strive to create quality pet products that conserve ecological resources whenever possible, and consciously avoid depleting natural resources. With more than 30 years of experience in manufacturing, product development and design, we take pride in creating eco-friendly and non-toxic items, reliable travel gear and innovative products. Contact us today, visit our website or call (909) 673-0998.

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